Presenter Email

furedy@ucmo.edu

Location

Jim W. Henderson Administration & Welcome Center (Bldg. #602)

Start Date

14-8-2018 10:30 AM

End Date

14-8-2018 11:45 AM

Submission Type

Presentation

Keywords

hazardous attitudes, gender differences, flight safety, human factors, decision making, pilot training, collegiate flight programs

Abstract

One of the minimum levels of flight training required to fly within the US includes obtaining the necessary skills to acquire a Private Pilot Certificate. Further training requirements are needed depending on whether one desires to operate under Visual Flight Rules (VFR) or Instrument Flight Rules (IFR). It has been stated by the FAA that Aeronautical Decision Making (ADM) training for pilots has been effective in reducing in-flight errors by up to 50 percent. Hazardous attitudes and their associated antidotes are currently discussed as part of the FAA’s ADM training for pilots. The purpose of this study is to add to the understanding of decision making differences and the effectiveness of instructing students on mitigating hazardous attitudes throughout their pilot training programs, in both male and female students using the New Hazardous Attitudes Survey. Results of this study discovered that only two of the six hazardous attitudes, Resignation and Self Confidence, were significantly lower in students who had advanced levels of flight training, as compared to those with only basic levels. Another significant result demonstrated that female’s overall hazardous attitudes scores were higher in the more advanced levels of flight training while males scores were lower.

Comments

Presented during Session 4 (continued): Flight Training

Presenter Biography

Matthew D. Furedy is an Assistant Professor of Aviation at the University of Central Missouri (UCM) and acts as the Graduate Program Coordinator for the department. He previously worked for the Nevada Department of Transportation as an Airport Inspector, Airport Planner, and ended his time there as the Statewide Aviation Manager. Dr. Furedy has been a member of the American Association of Airport Executives (AAAE) since 2015 and earned the Certified Member in 2016. He currently acts as the faculty advisor for the UCM AAAE Student Chapter. Dr. Furedy recently completed his Ed.D. degree in Educational Leadership from Gwynedd Mercy University in 2018. He received his B.S. in Airport Management from the University of Central Missouri in 1999 and a M.S. in Aviation Safety from Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University in 2013.

View Matthew Furedy’s Bio Page

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Aug 14th, 10:30 AM Aug 14th, 11:45 AM

Effectiveness of Hazardous Attitudes Mitigation in Pilot Training

Jim W. Henderson Administration & Welcome Center (Bldg. #602)

One of the minimum levels of flight training required to fly within the US includes obtaining the necessary skills to acquire a Private Pilot Certificate. Further training requirements are needed depending on whether one desires to operate under Visual Flight Rules (VFR) or Instrument Flight Rules (IFR). It has been stated by the FAA that Aeronautical Decision Making (ADM) training for pilots has been effective in reducing in-flight errors by up to 50 percent. Hazardous attitudes and their associated antidotes are currently discussed as part of the FAA’s ADM training for pilots. The purpose of this study is to add to the understanding of decision making differences and the effectiveness of instructing students on mitigating hazardous attitudes throughout their pilot training programs, in both male and female students using the New Hazardous Attitudes Survey. Results of this study discovered that only two of the six hazardous attitudes, Resignation and Self Confidence, were significantly lower in students who had advanced levels of flight training, as compared to those with only basic levels. Another significant result demonstrated that female’s overall hazardous attitudes scores were higher in the more advanced levels of flight training while males scores were lower.

 

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