Presenter Email

raymond.thompson@wmich.edu

Location

Jim W. Henderson Administration & Welcome Center (Bldg. #602)

Start Date

14-8-2018 2:45 PM

End Date

14-8-2018 3:45 PM

Submission Type

Presentation

Keywords

Scenario-based, human factors, aviation maintenance

Abstract

Aviation maintenance technician training programs primarily utilize general aviation equipment. Most graduates in the current demand-driven environment are taking positions with air carriers and MRO’s. Industry reports that new technicians required between 2 – 5 years of further training and experience to be considered able to work independently on the shop floor which exacerbates the technician shortage.

Scenario-based education provides graduates with an experience that provides a greater understanding of how large aircraft maintenance is developed and delivered in comparison to small general aviation aircraft. This will allow new hires to become capable of independent work in a shorter time frame allowing the workforce to grow more quickly.

This presentation will describe the development and student experience of a large aircraft scenario-based course in which students develop a limited maintenance program, identify safety issues and protocols, and integrate (not just read about) the human factors Dirty Dozen into the actual processes and procedures utilized.

Students implement and deliver the maintenance program and acting as the shift manager, lead technician, or technician to deliver the scheduled maintenance as well as non-routines and ACARS exercises. Work is documented and shift turnover communication processes are developed.

The course focuses on leadership, communication, safety, maintenance management, and how medium to large aircraft maintenance programs are developed and documented. Students develop a GENFAM for assigned systems and act as the system experts for the class. Several maintenance focused NTSB accident reports are examined to understand the role maintenance and human factors perform in aviation safety.

Comments

Presented during Session 6: Aviation Maintenance

Presenter Biography

Dr. Thompson has been affiliated with aviation and aerospace education since 1981, specifically aircraft technical education, advanced composite materials, and airline maintenance management. Currently, Dr. Thompson is associate dean of the College of Aviation at Western Michigan University (WMU). Primary responsibilities include curriculum, development of graduate programs, increasing college research, assessment, accreditation and strategic planning. Dr. Thompson is the WMU lead for two Federal Aviation Centers of Excellence: SOAR and PEGASAS. Prior to joining WMU in November 2009, Dr. Thompson was Program Manager of Aerospace at Khalifa University of Science, Technology, and Research (KUSTAR), Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates. During the 2007-2008 academic year, he was Founding Dean of the College of Aero & Astro Sciences at Dubai Aerospace Enterprise University (DAEU) in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. Dr. Thompson chaired the 2007-2008 FAA Part 147 Aviation Rulemaking Advisory Committee (ARAC) and chairs the current FAA Part 147 Working Group. Dr. Thompson is currently serving as an Educator Board of Trustee member for Aviation Accreditation Board International (AABI) and served as ATEC President 2010 – 2014.

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Aug 14th, 2:45 PM Aug 14th, 3:45 PM

Enhancing Aviation Maintenance Training Using Scenario-based Education

Jim W. Henderson Administration & Welcome Center (Bldg. #602)

Aviation maintenance technician training programs primarily utilize general aviation equipment. Most graduates in the current demand-driven environment are taking positions with air carriers and MRO’s. Industry reports that new technicians required between 2 – 5 years of further training and experience to be considered able to work independently on the shop floor which exacerbates the technician shortage.

Scenario-based education provides graduates with an experience that provides a greater understanding of how large aircraft maintenance is developed and delivered in comparison to small general aviation aircraft. This will allow new hires to become capable of independent work in a shorter time frame allowing the workforce to grow more quickly.

This presentation will describe the development and student experience of a large aircraft scenario-based course in which students develop a limited maintenance program, identify safety issues and protocols, and integrate (not just read about) the human factors Dirty Dozen into the actual processes and procedures utilized.

Students implement and deliver the maintenance program and acting as the shift manager, lead technician, or technician to deliver the scheduled maintenance as well as non-routines and ACARS exercises. Work is documented and shift turnover communication processes are developed.

The course focuses on leadership, communication, safety, maintenance management, and how medium to large aircraft maintenance programs are developed and documented. Students develop a GENFAM for assigned systems and act as the system experts for the class. Several maintenance focused NTSB accident reports are examined to understand the role maintenance and human factors perform in aviation safety.

 

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