Title

Aviation Cybersecurity: An Overview

Presenter Email

craigerj@erau.edu

Location

Jim W. Henderson Administration & Welcome Center (Bldg. #602)

Start Date

15-8-2018 9:30 AM

End Date

15-8-2018 10:45 AM

Submission Type

Presentation

Keywords

aviation, cybersecurity, information security, aerospace, aeronautics

Abstract

Information security—aka cybersecurity—is the most rapidly growing threat to critical infrastructures, including the aviation industry. Due to the plethora of digital devices, ubiquity of the Internet and other networks, and the rapid growth in the adoption of technology, everyone is an information system security manager. Every professional in the aviation and aeronautics industry use computers, mobile devices, tablets, GPS devices, and/or other hardware on a daily basis, as well as go online for a variety of reasons.

Attacks on information have been ongoing since the inception of the industry a hundred years ago, in such forms as intellectual property theft and industrial espionage. But the threats today have expanded to use the Internet as a threat vector, used by cybercriminals and other professional attackers on aerospace and defense organizations, creating national security vulnerability and an existential threat to the industry.

This presentation will present a high-level view of the threat vectors in the aviation industry. The different sectors within the industry will be described and potential threat vectors within the sectors identified. The "systems of systems" comprising the industry will be addressed in order to demonstrate how threats can emanate from one "trusted" organizations to another. Points of entry for cyberattacks will be addressed, such as networks, communications systems, the Internet of Things, and human error.

Comments

Presented during Session 8: Technology in Aviation

Presenter Biography

Dr. J. Philip Craiger is an Associate Professor of Cybersecurity in the Department of Security Studies and International Affairs. Philip previously served as Professor in the School of Engineering Technology at Daytona State College, where was the Principal Investigator of the $1.8 million NSF-funded Advanced Cyberforensics Education Consortium. From 2004-2010 he served a dual appointment at the University of Central Florida as the Assistant Director for Digital Evidence at the National Center for Forensic Science, and as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Engineering Technology. At UCF Philip was instrumental in developing the first Master of Science in Digital Forensics in the U.S. Philip started his career as an Associate Professor in the Department of Computer Science at the University of Nebraska at Omaha. He is a member of the American Academy of Forensic Sciences, and holds numerous professional certifications, including Certified Information Systems Security Practitioner (CISSP), and a Certified Cyber Forensics Practitioner (CCFP) from (ISC)2, SANS GIAC Computer Forensics Analyst, and an EC-Council Certified Ethical Hacker. His research and teaching interests include sUAS cybersecurity, and general aviation cybersecurity.

Dr. Craiger is a certified NAUI technical SCUBA instructor. He has hundreds of technical dives including cave diving in over 50 caves throughout the U.S. and Mexico, and several cave dives to 300 or more feet.

View Philip Craiger’s Bio Page

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Aug 15th, 9:30 AM Aug 15th, 10:45 AM

Aviation Cybersecurity: An Overview

Jim W. Henderson Administration & Welcome Center (Bldg. #602)

Information security—aka cybersecurity—is the most rapidly growing threat to critical infrastructures, including the aviation industry. Due to the plethora of digital devices, ubiquity of the Internet and other networks, and the rapid growth in the adoption of technology, everyone is an information system security manager. Every professional in the aviation and aeronautics industry use computers, mobile devices, tablets, GPS devices, and/or other hardware on a daily basis, as well as go online for a variety of reasons.

Attacks on information have been ongoing since the inception of the industry a hundred years ago, in such forms as intellectual property theft and industrial espionage. But the threats today have expanded to use the Internet as a threat vector, used by cybercriminals and other professional attackers on aerospace and defense organizations, creating national security vulnerability and an existential threat to the industry.

This presentation will present a high-level view of the threat vectors in the aviation industry. The different sectors within the industry will be described and potential threat vectors within the sectors identified. The "systems of systems" comprising the industry will be addressed in order to demonstrate how threats can emanate from one "trusted" organizations to another. Points of entry for cyberattacks will be addressed, such as networks, communications systems, the Internet of Things, and human error.