Title

The Effect of Electronic Flight Bags in Flight Training on Preflight Skill Development and Aeronautical Decision Making

Presenter Email

misras@my.erau.edu

Location

Jim W. Henderson Administration & Welcome Center (Bldg. #602)

Start Date

15-8-2018 8:00 AM

End Date

15-8-2018 9:30 AM

Submission Type

Poster

Other Topic Area

Electronic Flight Bags

Abstract

This study is designed to evaluate the effects Electronic Flight Bags in flight training have on skill development and Aeronautical Decision Making (ADM) in the preflight section of a flight. Electronic Flight Bags(EFBs) empower pilots through enhanced capabilities with simplified weather products, superimposed radar images, abridged Chart Supplements(AF/Ds) and Notices to Airmen(NOTAMs) information, and graphic information of Temporary Flight Restrictions, Special Use Airspaces, flight conditions, flight path, etc. This study was carried out using a triangulation method where we derived our conclusion and results through multiple tests obtaining both quantitative and qualitative data. The participants of this study were student pilots or private pilots who had not logged more than 100 flight hours and who used EFBs in their flight training. The study utilized a simulation of the preflight process of a Visual Flight Rules (VFR) cross country flight in which the participants had to answer 15 questions related to the preparation of the flight. Fifty percent of the population took this survey with the information provided through an EFB and the other fifty percent of the population (who used EFBs in their flight training as well) had to answer the questions without an EFB through traditional, unabridged, raw data. A comparative analysis of the data collected from both the groups was carried out through the responses using Likert scales, reactions to certain factors in flight, and responses related to the interpretation of data. The participants also completed an anonymous survey that collected data about their dependence on EFBs during flights, process of ADM when an EFB is not available, and their ability to comprehend data when they had to work with data that was not simplified and abridged through external tools such as EFBs.

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Aug 15th, 8:00 AM Aug 15th, 9:30 AM

The Effect of Electronic Flight Bags in Flight Training on Preflight Skill Development and Aeronautical Decision Making

Jim W. Henderson Administration & Welcome Center (Bldg. #602)

This study is designed to evaluate the effects Electronic Flight Bags in flight training have on skill development and Aeronautical Decision Making (ADM) in the preflight section of a flight. Electronic Flight Bags(EFBs) empower pilots through enhanced capabilities with simplified weather products, superimposed radar images, abridged Chart Supplements(AF/Ds) and Notices to Airmen(NOTAMs) information, and graphic information of Temporary Flight Restrictions, Special Use Airspaces, flight conditions, flight path, etc. This study was carried out using a triangulation method where we derived our conclusion and results through multiple tests obtaining both quantitative and qualitative data. The participants of this study were student pilots or private pilots who had not logged more than 100 flight hours and who used EFBs in their flight training. The study utilized a simulation of the preflight process of a Visual Flight Rules (VFR) cross country flight in which the participants had to answer 15 questions related to the preparation of the flight. Fifty percent of the population took this survey with the information provided through an EFB and the other fifty percent of the population (who used EFBs in their flight training as well) had to answer the questions without an EFB through traditional, unabridged, raw data. A comparative analysis of the data collected from both the groups was carried out through the responses using Likert scales, reactions to certain factors in flight, and responses related to the interpretation of data. The participants also completed an anonymous survey that collected data about their dependence on EFBs during flights, process of ADM when an EFB is not available, and their ability to comprehend data when they had to work with data that was not simplified and abridged through external tools such as EFBs.