Title

Pilot Shortage: Sustainability Perspective

Presenter Email

aokal@uwaterloo.ca

Location

Jim W. Henderson Administration & Welcome Center (Bldg. #602)

Start Date

13-8-2018 10:30 AM

End Date

13-8-2018 12:00 PM

Submission Type

Presentation

Keywords

Pilot supply, pilot shortage, sustainability, sustainable development goals

Abstract

Air transport is recently going through an exponential economic growth (ICAO, 2016). Similarly, industry forecast reports predict an upward trend for the next 20 years (Boeing, 2015). While these forecasts offer many opportunities, there are concerns as to whether or not this growth is sustainable. Defined as meeting “the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their needs”, sustainable development (SD), also adopted by United Nations (UN), brings more comprehensive approach to the subject (WCED, 1987, p. 43). The SD envisions a “balanced strategy” among economic (profit), social (people) and environmental (planet) domains, also known as “triple bottom line” (Elkington et al., 2007, p. 1). This balanced strategy can be represented in various ways reflecting interactions among three domains (Lozano, 2008). As holding a vision of going beyond present in terms of both time and place, SD emphasizes multi-dimensional thinking through three domains.

From a sustainability perspective, the global pilot shortage becomes one of the most relevant subjects in the air transport industry. Since the pilot supply directly impacts aviation operations, it has substantial reflections on SD domains, especially economic and social. In this regard, predicted pilot scarcity, which may get worse with global competition attracting more pilots, has negative impacts on global and local markets. Considering interconnected nature of industries on a global scale, the impact of pilot shortage likely influences related industries, such as tourism, trade, customer services, etc. with much greater magnitudes impacting direct and indirect aviation jobs (ATAG, 2016). Additionally, air transport contributes to people’s mobility with its high connectivity. Thus, economic and social domains may directly be affected as a result of points mentioned above.

As a global commitment, UN announced 17 “Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)” for sustainable shared future in 2015. In this context, Air Transport Action Group’s Report (2016) is an analysis of air transport through SDGs. Similarly, reviewing the pilot shortage through SD perspective emerges as a need in academia so as to enable better appreciation of underlying origins of pilot shortage and sustainable solutions in addition to current studies (Higgins et al., 2013; Lutte and Lovelace, 2017). Sustainability concept may enable more systematic approaches to the formulation and attainment of SDGs. Besides, reexamining specific SDGs of “gender equality”, “economic growth” and “partnership” may contribute to the current discussions within aviation. This paper aims to review the pilot shortage with sustainability perspective and reflect on for possible scenarios and solutions.

References:

ATAG – Air Transport Action Group. (2016). Aviation: Benefits Beyond Borders. Geneva.

Boeing. (2015). Current Market Outlook 2015-2034. Boeing.Com, 30.

Elkington, J., Tickell, S., and Lee, M., (2007). 20 Years of global leadership. London: SustainAbility.

Higgins, J., Lovelace, K., Bjerke, E., Lounsberry, N., Lutte, R., Friedenzohn, D., Craig, P. (2013). An Investigation of the United States Airline Pilot Labor Supply, (June), 36.

ICAO. (2016). ICAO Long-Term Traffic Forecasts Passenger and Cargo, (July).

Lozano, R. (2008). Envisioning sustainability three-dimensionally. Journal of Cleaner Production, 16(17), 1838-1846.

Lutte, R., & Lovelace, K. (2017). Airline Pilot Supply in the US: Factors Influencing the Collegiate Pilot Pipeline. Journal of Aviation Technology & Engineering, 6(2), 53.

WCED. (1987). Our Common Future. World Commission on Environment and Development. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Comments

Presented during Session 2: Pilot Supply

Presenter Biography

Adem Okal is a former military pilot with service over 10 years including flight safety, human resources and planning. He is currently a PhD student at the University of Waterloo. His research focuses on pilot supply, recruitment and retention practices.

View Adem Okal’s Bio Page

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Aug 13th, 10:30 AM Aug 13th, 12:00 PM

Pilot Shortage: Sustainability Perspective

Jim W. Henderson Administration & Welcome Center (Bldg. #602)

Air transport is recently going through an exponential economic growth (ICAO, 2016). Similarly, industry forecast reports predict an upward trend for the next 20 years (Boeing, 2015). While these forecasts offer many opportunities, there are concerns as to whether or not this growth is sustainable. Defined as meeting “the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their needs”, sustainable development (SD), also adopted by United Nations (UN), brings more comprehensive approach to the subject (WCED, 1987, p. 43). The SD envisions a “balanced strategy” among economic (profit), social (people) and environmental (planet) domains, also known as “triple bottom line” (Elkington et al., 2007, p. 1). This balanced strategy can be represented in various ways reflecting interactions among three domains (Lozano, 2008). As holding a vision of going beyond present in terms of both time and place, SD emphasizes multi-dimensional thinking through three domains.

From a sustainability perspective, the global pilot shortage becomes one of the most relevant subjects in the air transport industry. Since the pilot supply directly impacts aviation operations, it has substantial reflections on SD domains, especially economic and social. In this regard, predicted pilot scarcity, which may get worse with global competition attracting more pilots, has negative impacts on global and local markets. Considering interconnected nature of industries on a global scale, the impact of pilot shortage likely influences related industries, such as tourism, trade, customer services, etc. with much greater magnitudes impacting direct and indirect aviation jobs (ATAG, 2016). Additionally, air transport contributes to people’s mobility with its high connectivity. Thus, economic and social domains may directly be affected as a result of points mentioned above.

As a global commitment, UN announced 17 “Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)” for sustainable shared future in 2015. In this context, Air Transport Action Group’s Report (2016) is an analysis of air transport through SDGs. Similarly, reviewing the pilot shortage through SD perspective emerges as a need in academia so as to enable better appreciation of underlying origins of pilot shortage and sustainable solutions in addition to current studies (Higgins et al., 2013; Lutte and Lovelace, 2017). Sustainability concept may enable more systematic approaches to the formulation and attainment of SDGs. Besides, reexamining specific SDGs of “gender equality”, “economic growth” and “partnership” may contribute to the current discussions within aviation. This paper aims to review the pilot shortage with sustainability perspective and reflect on for possible scenarios and solutions.

References:

ATAG – Air Transport Action Group. (2016). Aviation: Benefits Beyond Borders. Geneva.

Boeing. (2015). Current Market Outlook 2015-2034. Boeing.Com, 30.

Elkington, J., Tickell, S., and Lee, M., (2007). 20 Years of global leadership. London: SustainAbility.

Higgins, J., Lovelace, K., Bjerke, E., Lounsberry, N., Lutte, R., Friedenzohn, D., Craig, P. (2013). An Investigation of the United States Airline Pilot Labor Supply, (June), 36.

ICAO. (2016). ICAO Long-Term Traffic Forecasts Passenger and Cargo, (July).

Lozano, R. (2008). Envisioning sustainability three-dimensionally. Journal of Cleaner Production, 16(17), 1838-1846.

Lutte, R., & Lovelace, K. (2017). Airline Pilot Supply in the US: Factors Influencing the Collegiate Pilot Pipeline. Journal of Aviation Technology & Engineering, 6(2), 53.

WCED. (1987). Our Common Future. World Commission on Environment and Development. Oxford: Oxford University Press.