Presenter Email

Alaba.Idowu@enmu.edu

Submission Type

Presentation

Keywords

Single-Pilot Resource Management, Crew Resource Management, Threat and Error Management, Risk Management, and Human Factors

Abstract

This research aims to determine the effectiveness of single-pilot resource management (SRM) towards improved safety in general aviation (GA) as compared to its counterpart, crew resource management (CRM), in commercial aviation that has improved commercial safety drastically. GA safety has been a significant concern due to many fatalities. Despite SRM concepts to ensure safe and successful flight operations, evidence showed that GA suffers a higher fatal accident rate than scheduled airline flights and holds a lackluster safety record, accounting for 94% of civil aviation fatalities. In contrast, commercial aviation safety has improved since the implementation of CRM. The investigation examines the evolution of CRM in the last four decades and how it has enhanced commercial aviation safety and compares it with the concepts of SRM in GA through a survey from general aviation pilots. The methods of investigation include both quantitative and qualitative research approaches to determine SRM effectiveness and factors that may be responsible for its ineffectiveness in GA. An analysis of the data and information synthesis arrive at results, conclusions, and recommendations to improve GA safety. The results state that (a) a lack of constant and monitored human factors awareness training in GA renders the concept of SRM ineffective (b) most GA pilots lack personal development to ensure continuous human factors training. The corrective recommendation includes annual human factors awareness training for general aviation pilots. The conclusions of the study confirm that (1) SRM concepts are ineffective in ensuring improved GA safety due to a lack of constant and monitored human factors awareness training in GA, and (2) to ensure improved aviation safety, GA pilots need to be held at a high level of professionalism.

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1510- Idowu - Determining The Effectiveness of SRM in GA Presentation.pptx (368 kB)
COinS
 

Determining The Effectiveness of Single-Pilot Resource Management in General Aviation

This research aims to determine the effectiveness of single-pilot resource management (SRM) towards improved safety in general aviation (GA) as compared to its counterpart, crew resource management (CRM), in commercial aviation that has improved commercial safety drastically. GA safety has been a significant concern due to many fatalities. Despite SRM concepts to ensure safe and successful flight operations, evidence showed that GA suffers a higher fatal accident rate than scheduled airline flights and holds a lackluster safety record, accounting for 94% of civil aviation fatalities. In contrast, commercial aviation safety has improved since the implementation of CRM. The investigation examines the evolution of CRM in the last four decades and how it has enhanced commercial aviation safety and compares it with the concepts of SRM in GA through a survey from general aviation pilots. The methods of investigation include both quantitative and qualitative research approaches to determine SRM effectiveness and factors that may be responsible for its ineffectiveness in GA. An analysis of the data and information synthesis arrive at results, conclusions, and recommendations to improve GA safety. The results state that (a) a lack of constant and monitored human factors awareness training in GA renders the concept of SRM ineffective (b) most GA pilots lack personal development to ensure continuous human factors training. The corrective recommendation includes annual human factors awareness training for general aviation pilots. The conclusions of the study confirm that (1) SRM concepts are ineffective in ensuring improved GA safety due to a lack of constant and monitored human factors awareness training in GA, and (2) to ensure improved aviation safety, GA pilots need to be held at a high level of professionalism.

 

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