Title

A Method of Identification of a Failed Engine in Twin-Engine Turboprop Aircraft: A Survey

Presenter Email

andrey.k.babin@gmail.com

Location

Jim W. Henderson Administration & Welcome Center (Bldg. #602)

Start Date

15-8-2018 8:00 AM

End Date

15-8-2018 9:30 AM

Submission Type

Poster

Other Topic Area

Aviation Safety

Keywords

turboprop, twin-engine, aircraft, engine failure, identify-verify-feather, engine feathering

Abstract

Previous research identified that wrong identification of a failed engine during a flight is not an uncommon event in an aircraft cockpit. A number of fatal accidents in the past, including the recent TransAsia Flight 235 accident, resulted from failed engine mis-identification. Most accidents of this type happened on takeoff when pilot workload was at its highest level. A short survey was created and distributed among airline pilots who operate twin-engine turboprop aircraft to gather their opinions regarding the issue. Forty-nine pilots responded to the survey. The average flight experience was more than 6,000 flight hours and almost nine years. Approximately 19 percent of respondents had to utilize the engine-out procedure in their experience. The majority of respondents felt comfortable with the current method of identification of a failed engine. Twenty-nine percent of respondents to the survey agreed with the statement that there could be a better method of identification of a failed engine. Thirty-four percent of respondents who provided suggestions for improvement of a current method recommended adding a visual indicator of some kind. The results of the survey provide greater insight into the problem of wrong identification of a failed engine in twin-engine propeller aircraft.

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Aug 15th, 8:00 AM Aug 15th, 9:30 AM

A Method of Identification of a Failed Engine in Twin-Engine Turboprop Aircraft: A Survey

Jim W. Henderson Administration & Welcome Center (Bldg. #602)

Previous research identified that wrong identification of a failed engine during a flight is not an uncommon event in an aircraft cockpit. A number of fatal accidents in the past, including the recent TransAsia Flight 235 accident, resulted from failed engine mis-identification. Most accidents of this type happened on takeoff when pilot workload was at its highest level. A short survey was created and distributed among airline pilots who operate twin-engine turboprop aircraft to gather their opinions regarding the issue. Forty-nine pilots responded to the survey. The average flight experience was more than 6,000 flight hours and almost nine years. Approximately 19 percent of respondents had to utilize the engine-out procedure in their experience. The majority of respondents felt comfortable with the current method of identification of a failed engine. Twenty-nine percent of respondents to the survey agreed with the statement that there could be a better method of identification of a failed engine. Thirty-four percent of respondents who provided suggestions for improvement of a current method recommended adding a visual indicator of some kind. The results of the survey provide greater insight into the problem of wrong identification of a failed engine in twin-engine propeller aircraft.